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Brown Spring Polypore Polyporus arcularius

Brown Spring Polypore (Polyporus arcularius)

Brown Spring Polypore Polyporus arcularius

  • Photos
  • Videos
  • Description
  • Habitat
  • Edibility
  • Medicinal Uses
  • Similar Species
  • Preserving (Drying or Freezing)
  • Recipe Suggestions
  • References

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Photos:

 Videos: 

Description:

Scientific name:   Polyporus arcularius (Batsch) Fr.
Derivation of name:   Polyporus means “many pores”;
arcularius means “with small boxes” in reference to the
pores.
Synonymy:   Boletus arcularius Batsch
Common names: Spring polypore.
Phylum:   Basidiomycota
Order:   Polyporales
Family:   Polyporaceae
Occurrence on wood substrate: Saprobic; solitary or in
groups on decaying deciduous wood or attached to buried
wood; April through June.
Dimensions: Caps 1-8 cm wide; stipes 2-6 cm long and
1.5-4.5 mm thick, central, colored like the cap.
Upper surface: Dark brown when young, becoming yellow-
brown in age; dry; scaly; margin lined with conspicuous hairs.
Pore surface: White to pale yellow; pores polygonal to
angular, radially arranged; pores 0.5-1 per mm.
Edibility: Edible when young, becomes very tough and leathery with age.
Comments: One of the first mushrooms to appear in the
spring. Compare to Pbrumalis which has a darker cap
without a fringed margin and smaller pores.

Habitat:

Occurrence on wood substrate: Saprobic; solitary or in
groups on decaying deciduous wood or attached to buried
wood; April through June.

 Edibility:

Edibility: Edible when young, becomes very tough and leathery with age.

Medicinal Uses:

Bioactive compounds:

P. arcularius has been chemically investigated (Fleck et al., 1996) yielding isodrimenediol, drimenediol, and related sesquiterpenes. Later, two additional compounds, named isocryptoporic acids H (3-carboxy-2- (2,5,5,8a-tetramethyl- 1,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-naphthalen-1-ylmethoxy) -pentanedioic acid) and isocryptoporic acid I (3-carboxy-2- (6-hydroxy-2,5,5,8a-tetramethyl-1,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a- octahydro-naphthalen-1-ylmethoxy) -pentanedioic acid.), were isolated. These isocryptoporic acids are isomers of the cryptoporic acids with drimenol instead of albicanol as the terpenoid fragment (Cabrera et al., 2002).

Medicinal properties:

Antibacterial activity

Both the aqueous and organic fractions from an extract of the mycelial culture of P. arcularius showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coliSalmonella typhimuriumStaphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis (Yamac and Bilgili, 2006). Another group had previously reported antimicrobial activity in this species, but also noted some intra-specific genetic differences (Suay et al., 2004).

Antitumor activity

Polysaccharides extracted from the mycelial culture of P. arcularius and administered intraperitoneally into white mice at a dosage of 300 mg/kg inhibited the growth of Sarcoma 180 and Ehrlich solid cancers by 90% and 100%, respectively (Ohtsuka et al., 1973).

Similar Species: 

Polyporus brumalis, Compare to Pbrumalis which has a darker cap
without a fringed margin and smaller pores.

Compare to P. brumalis which has a darker cap without a fringed margin and smaller pores.

Preserving (Drying or Freezing):

N/A

Recipe Suggestions:

Young specimens I just dice up and add to my mushroom soup.

 References:

https://mushroomexpert.com/polyporus_arcularius.html

https://healing-mushrooms.net/archives/polyporus-arcularius.html