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Cantharellus lateritius smooth chanterelle

Cantharellus lateritius (Smooth Chanterelle)

  • Photos
  • Growth
  • Videos
  • Description
  • Edibility
  • Similar Species/ Variations
  • Look Alikes
  • Medicinal Info
  • Drying and Freezing
  • Recipes
  • References

Photos:

Growth:

Chanterelles grow very slowly. From young button stage to fully mature size can take up to 30 days!

Videos:

Description:

Cantharellus lateritius, commonly known as the smooth chanterelle, is a species of edible fungus in the Cantharellaceae family of mushrooms. A ectomycorrhizal species, it is found in Asia, Africa, and North America. The species has a complex taxonomic history, and has undergone several name changes since its first description by American mycologist Lewis David de Schweinitz in 1822. The fruit bodies of the fungus are brightly colored yellow to orange, and usually highly conspicuous against the soil in which they are found. At maturity, the mushroom resembles a filled funnel with the spore-bearing surface along the sloping outer sides. The texture of the fertile undersurface (hymenium) of the caps is a distinguishing characteristic of the species: unlike the well-known golden chanterelle, the hymenium of C. lateritius is much smoother. Chemical analysis has revealed the presence of several carotenoid compounds in the fruit bodies.

Edible and choice. Chanterelles are one of the most commonly foraged wild mushrooms in the US.

Chanterelles in general go well with eggs, curry, chicken, pork, fish, beef and veal, can be used as toppings on pizzas, be stewed, marinated, sauteed, or used as filling for stuffed crêpes. Of course these are just examples; chanterelles are versatile and can be added as an ingredient to most dishes. In European cuisine, chanterelles are often served with venison. A traditional method of preparing these mushrooms is sauteed and then used to make scrambled eggs. In Polish tradition chanterelles are used for making creamy sauces that top chicken. Many mushroom enthusiasts just like chanterelles sauteed in butter, with a pinch of salt, a clove of fresh crushed garlic and some whipping cream. This recipe is said to bring out the subtle flavor of the chanterelle without masking it with other aromas. This recipe has the added benefit of retaining flavor even after being stored frozen.

Similar Species (Variations):

Cantharellus confluens, Multi-stemmed smooth.

Cantharellus spectaculus

Cantharellus persicinus, the peach or pink chanterelle.

Cantharellus phasmatis is a species very similar but has a white stem and false gills. 

Look Alikes:

Caution must be used when identifying chanterelles for consumption due to lookalikes, such as the Jack-O-Lantern species (Omphalotus olearius and others), which can make a person very ill. Despite this, chanterelles are one of the most recognized and harvested groups of edible mushrooms.

Jack O Lantern (Left) Chanterelle (Right)

False Chanterelle:

Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca, a gilled boletoid fungus, can easily be mistaken for the highly prized edible Chanterelle, Cantharellus cibarius, and although some consider it safe (but bitter tasting) to eat some concerns still remain about it.

Medicinal/Nutritional Info:

Many species of chanterelles contain antioxidant carotenoids, such as beta-carotene in C. cibarius and C. minor, and canthaxanthin in C. cinnabarinus and C. friesii. They also contain significant amounts of vitamin D. Scientific research has suggested that the golden chanterelle may have potent insecticidal properties that are harmless to humans and yet protect the mushroom body against insects and other potentially harmful organisms.

Drying and Freezing:

Since the mushrooms hold a lot of water, they are often prepared using a “dry sauté” method: after cleaning, the mushrooms are sliced and put in a covered pan over high heat with no oil or butter. The mushrooms then release much of their water, which can be allowed to boil off or be poured off and used as a stock. Many people often cook the mushrooms with butter because it “sweetens” them. Chanterelles can also be pickled in brine. Salted water is brought to a boil and pickling spices such as peppercorns, mustard seeds, and thyme are added. The mushrooms are then cooked in this solution for 5–10 minutes before being transferred to sterilized bottles along with some of the liquid. Sliced garlic and dill can be added to the bottles for extra flavor. The remaining liquid forms an excellent stock for making soup. When pickled in this way, chanterelles can last from six to twelve months. Another storage technique is drying. Mushrooms can be dried with gentle heat in an oven at temperatures of 65 °C (149 °F) or less. A vacuum process is also practical on large orders. A few hours before final preparation, put dry mushrooms in water which they absorb for returning to nearly original size. Mushrooms can then be used as fresh, and will last indefinitely as dry. Fresh chanterelles can generally be stored up to ten days in a refrigerator. Chanterelles are also well-suited for drying, and tend to maintain their aroma and consistency quite well. Some chefs profess that reconstituted chanterelles are actually superior in flavor to fresh ones, though they lose in texture whatever they gain in flavor by becoming more chewy after being preserved by drying. Dried chanterelles can also be crushed into flour and used in seasoning in soups or sauces. Chanterelles are also suitable for freezing, though older frozen chanterelles can often develop a slightly bitter taste after thawing.

Recipes:

Though records of chanterelles being eaten date back to the 16th century, they first gained widespread recognition as a culinary delicacy with the spreading influence of French cuisine in the 18th century, when they began appearing in palace kitchens. For many years, they remained notable for being served at the tables of nobility. Nowadays, the usage of chanterelles in the kitchen is common throughout Europe and North America. In 1836, the Swedish mycologist Elias Fries considered the chanterelle “as one of the most important and best edible mushrooms.”

Chanterelles as a group are generally described as being rich in flavor, with a distinctive taste and aroma difficult to characterize. Some species have a fruity odor, others a more woody, earthy fragrance, and still others can even be considered spicy. The golden chanterelle is perhaps the most sought-after and flavorful chanterelle, and many chefs consider it on the same short list of gourmet fungi as truffles and morels. It therefore tends to command a high price in both restaurants and specialty stores.

There are many ways to cook chanterelles. Most of the flavorful compounds in chanterelles are fat-soluble, making them good mushrooms to sauté in butter, oil or cream. They also contain smaller amounts of water- and alcohol-soluble flavorings, which lend the mushrooms well to recipes involving wine or other cooking alcohols. Many popular methods of cooking chanterelles include them in sautés, soufflés, cream sauces, and soups. They are not typically eaten raw, as their rich and complex flavor is best released when cooked.

Broiled Scallops with Chanterelles Recipe - Lovely broiled scallops are served with a browned butter sauce and chanterelle mushrooms for a quick dish that's great for company.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/231868/broiled-scallops-with-chanterelles/?internalSource=rotd&referringId=15174&referringContentType=Recipe%20Hub

Chanterelle Risotto Recipe - Savory and cheesy, this sublime vegetarian risotto makes a wonderful main dish for fall dinner parties.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/47757/chanterelle-risotto/?internalSource=hub%20recipe&referringId=15174&referringContentType=Recipe%20Hub

Chanterelle Mushroom and Bacon Tartlets Recipe - Wild chanterelle mushrooms and bacon combine wonderfully in this impressive and elegant starter.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/52559/chanterelle-mushroom-and-bacon-tartlets/?internalSource=hub%20recipe&referringId=15174&referringContentType=Recipe%20Hub

Chicken with Chanterelle Mushrooms and Marsala Wine Recipe - This take on a classic recipe combination of chicken and Marsala wine uses chanterelle mushrooms and plenty of butter to deliver a tasty chicken main dish.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/221551/chicken-with-chanterelle-mushrooms-and-marsala-wine/?internalSource=hub%20recipe&referringId=15174&referringContentType=Recipe%20Hub

References:

https://www.mushroomexpert.com/cantharellus_lateritius.html

https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/143270-Cantharellus-lateritius

https://mushroomobserver.org/name/show_name/1061